ZAD calls out for Intl day against police on November 22nd

November 22nd: an international day against police violence and repression

The repression that falls on those who oppose the mafia-like projects of politicians is ever more violent.

The Socialist party coming to power hasn't changed anything.

The police, the gendarmes and the army injure and mutilate as much as ever, maybe even more, surfing on the wave of fascism that is rising up under the guise of a world economic crisis, and thanks to their weapons, becoming always more efficient with the emphasis on military technology.

Even more worrisome than constantly increasing war budgets is the unwillingness of cops, gendarmes, soldiers and their politician bosses to take responsibility for their violence. The omnipresence and unrestrained usage of flashballs, defensive ball launchers, and explosive grenades are some concrete examples.

The discourse is also simplified, glossed over, and the violence made to seem mundane. When we ask the cops in front of us if they are proud to have killed, they smile or threaten us. One of the police authorities in the Tarn recently affirmed that those who oppose the “forces of order” should expect violence and eventual injury.

And, some days ago, the police killed. Again.

We, who were gathered together in Testet to fight against this deathly project of the Sivens dam, we lost a friend. In the early hours of Sunday, October 26th, a few meters from soldiers of the State, armed and protected by their weapons and shields, Rémi Fraisse was murdered by the armed branch of the State.

By the level shot of a mercenary's grenade, most likely aimed at his head, the explosive hit between the base of his neck and his shoulder. This despite that even the internal laws of the armed branches of the State forbid level shots at a certain distance and also forbid aiming at the head, or with some weapons, aiming at all.

This was not an accident. It's even surprising that such a drama hasn't happened earlier. The attacking police, gendarmes, and soldiers brake their own laws every day (of the evictions). We've lost track of the knees, hands, stomachs and heads that have been targeted. Their extraordinary and illegal violence leaves its trace on all of us, whether physical or emotional. This time it took someone with it: Rémi Fraisse.

But even if Rémi's murder is headlining the nightly news and embarrassing the government, don't believe that it's an exception.

At the end of August, an “illegal” migrant died in a car with the BAC (a notoriously violent undercover police force) while being brought to the airport. It was almost ten years ago that the teenagers Zyed Benna and Bouna Traoré died hiding in an electric transformer after being chased there by the police. We're not even mentioning deaths in war for economic interests, in Mali or elsewhere...

We've stopped counting on the charges pressed by those close to the ones murdered by an armed branch of the State. None of these trials have resulted in prison sentences.

We want rapid and implacable justice for the murderers in the armed branches of the State.

We demand that starting now, there is a legal amnesty for all those arrested for their opposition to the Sivens dam, who we consider to be almost political prisoners.

We also demand the total disarmament of the multiple armed branches of the State, to end the murders, the “mistakes” and the violence of police, gendarmes, and military.

Thus we join the call of the ZAD of Notre Dame des Landes to demonstrate everywhere against police repression on Saturday, November 22nd, 2014.

We call upon every person and every group that feels concerned by the danger represented by the State's police forces to make actions and protest from wherever they are.

Let's make November 22nd a national and international day against the violence of armed branches of the State, but let's not forget that every day, before and after the 22nd, is a good day to make an insurgency against the existence of an institution which mutilates and murders for a “law-based” state and their profitable, mafia-like, and devastating projects.

Indignons-nous !

proposal--

Where did it come from, the grenade that killed Rémi? Strategic proposal for what comes next.
Rémi was killed by a police concussion grenade, Sunday October 26th. What happened to him could have happened to any one of us, anywhere. Some days later, Thursday the 30th, in a northern neighborhood in Blois, a young man lost an eye to a state rubber bullet. Saturday in Nantes, a demonstator took a rubber bullet to the face and lost his nose. How many times must history repeat itself?

We are not making demands to State power, for the conviction of the cop who shot him, or the resignation of a higher police official, or even the Minister of the Interior. For the death of Rémi to resonate everywhere and provoke a real movement, we propose to organize ourselves locally and nationally against the infrastructures that maintain order.

These are the infrastructures which make possible the terrorism of the State, which we are confronted with in the “ghettos” as well as in our social movements. These are the infrastructures which organize the police occupation of our territories and our existences. It is also them who are deployed as soon as a movement of opposition or contestation adventures outside of traditional paths cordoned off by powerlessness.

France is an expert in maintaining order, by neutralizing all efforts of people to rise up/bring themselves up. It exports globally it's knowledge, weapons, and forms to many foreign police forces. It has also participated in crushing movements across the world, as in the insurrections of the Arab Spring in 2011. Didn't Michèle Alliot-Marie brag to have provided French expertise in counter-insurrection to the Ben Ali regime? Paralyzing the infrastructure of the police is an act which, outside of the national context, supports all those who organize to struggle in other places and have to dodge French bullets.

The factories that make grenades, uniforms, and equipment for the police, their vehicles and their televised propaganda, the logistical platforms that organize food supplies for the troops; for us they are all targets. Outside of occasional confrontations or deployments, the continued existence of the armed group known as the national police depends on these resources.
The announcement that a certain type of offensive grenade has been suspended will not bring about a “return to calm”. What's at stake in this movement, born on October 25th, is disarming the police. Flashballs, tasers, concussion grenades, have sufficiently mutilated, injured, or killed in these past couple of years.

We are no longer in the era of Malik Oussekine or Vittal Michalon*. Not a single union, not a single leftist organization called out for people to take the streets after Rémi's death. They are in fact so afraid of the streets, they are reduced to organizing virtual protests like those proposed by the Green Party (#occupysivens).

What can we expect from the “Occupiers” who “condemn the violence of both sides” by carefully omitting which camp is equipped for war and which has a few cobblestones? That one side kills people and the other expresses their rage by breaking windows? At a time when the left is decomposing, when the far right are on the upswing, why is there not a single reaction from leftist political parties, NGO's, or unions, after this police murder?

This week, 90 protests were organized in around 60 cities. We address our call-out to this autonomous power in the making. The collective emotion expressed in rage and contemplation is legitimate, but won't be enough to change the situation.

We call for a long term strategy, consisting of harassing and collecting information on all those who support repression, to disrupt all the technical ways which permit it to be armed, to move, to feed itself, and more. These objectives encompass a diversity of tactics that correspond to the resources and limitations of groups and individuals. Noise demos outside police stations and barracks, verbal harassment of patrols, suing the police for injuries, sabotage, street demos; it's the simultaneous usage of all these tactics that will help us to establish a favorable “rapport de force” against the police, in our neighborhoods and in our struggles.

A call-out is coming soon to organize demos in front of police weapons manufacturers. A list of strategic places will also appear soon. This is a strategic proposition that we are addressing to all those that are assembling, agitating, and organizing so that the backlash against this latest police murder spreads and grows.

*Malik Oussekine was killed by police in the student strikes of 1986, and Vittal Michalon in an anti-nuclear demonstration in 1977

category: 

Comments

"The Socialist party coming to power hasn't changed anything."

Whoa whoa whoa! I thought France was supposed to have become a candyland full of social justice and de-privatization and cops got re-mobilized towards helping the poor by closing jails, building them homes and bringing them good organic food! Wasn't the IMF Socialists into humanitarian aid to impoverished countries anyways!? GIMME BACK MY VOTE!!!

Lets riot against the people responsible at the top. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEV5AFFcZ-s 53 min.

It's worth noting that although the first piece (there are two pieces here, it's just hard to tell) is ridiculous at times it's actually very radical for the group that wrote it. More than anything it's interesting because it shows how tense the political climate in France is right now.

It is, indeed. As people aren't just realizing they're part of a completely fucked up banana republic, but also organize and do something about it (as oppose to the sad state of dissent in the US).

As awful as these kind of tragedies always are, I still cringe when I read lines like "despite that even the internal laws of the armed branches of the State forbid level shots at a certain distance and also forbid aiming at the head, or with some weapons, aiming at all."

Presumably that's aimed at a broader liberal-outrage audience? They can't be that naive.

Only perhaps in terms of the audience to which it's addressed, even wherein I think there is only a small shred that really views itself in all-out war against the cops. Those who haven't learned that sentiment by experience may still be sensitive to the issue of hypocrisy. Speaking of which - I seem to recall these sort of debates going back decades. Why collude with the leftist reaction to some particular detail that the more radical among us wouldn't call any different from business as usual? I mean wasn't this guy a pacifist tree-sitter? How liberal is that? The argument is usually if we issue (or respond to) a call-out it's so we can use the liberal mass as cover for orchestrating preferred forms of revolt. Hypocritical and geared entirely toward producing an ideologically-formulated specific program of what constitutes actual or worthwhile resistance....yet, the guerrilla can never resist striking when the opportunity presents itself. Yet: are anarcho-activists guerrillas, ie does that really apply here or more just offer a lame justification for tagging along with the left?

I am undecided. My town had a day against police in the spring that was mostly spontaneous and only (as far as I can see) alluded to by left wing wingnuts, pacifist academics and the like. There is potential for another explosion here (I was shocked how quiet it stayed during the ferguson uprising - leftists here were obsessively laser-focused on Gaza). Rambling now,...

Whatever happened to that project about small towns/scenes? Seems like our would be relevant to the second paragraph.

I think It just turned into a zine about the town/scene of the person who proposed the zine, which was never published.

Good critique.  «Yet: are anarcho-activists guerrillas, ie does that really apply here or more just offer a lame justification for tagging along with the left?»

There sure are but I think in France it’s a huge mishmash of many activist or more militant perspectives, sometimes intertwined and sometimes really divergent. The advantage in NA Vs France is that the Left is much more visible and tagged already, so you know, people are formalized and ideologically framed before they even take to the streets. So as long as you manage to organize with all the apolitical proles and lumpens, you’ll be scoring big hits I think. I’ve seen A’s in their early twenties in France going to stir shit up in high schools, and this paid a LOT. Though thirtysomethings like me wouldn’t probably do that without wearing a pedobear costume, you know... The idea is that it’s possible to stop sticking to the left to organize with more serious people, though it’s very hard unless you got some strategy to «pull» them off the conveyor belts of the system (unemployment offices maybe?).How the formal Left actually are amassing numbers of drones is by baiting and collecting them at college/university points of entry, through the campus/community involvement (i.e. work and/or sexual slavery) serving some bullshit hypocrite moral cause related to social or climate justice, with the promise of being hand-picked by the Hierarchy at some point so to have a brilliant future in some global NGO. Only thing I don’t hate with the lefties is that most aren’t sexually-sick paedos, unlike the more politically-conservative NGOs , Christian groups and sports-related orgs who do the exact same gimmick, but with young teenagers and even children as targets. I think there’s some anarchists who know the whole game already, as they came from the nonprofit sector, out of sheer disgust and contempt. But I think there are more honest, respectful, appropriate ways to reach others, perhaps at the end points of the same system, and/or just earlier in their social formatting process. What matters is to develop some form of anti-State infrastructure during times when things are quiet, that's reaching to all those who share the same issues with the totalitarian social order.

But I’m still struggling with the issue of person-to-person contact, that is much more difficult, yet more constructive and lively than just clandestine agit-prop. I mean people can’t chat or argue with fixed, lifeless, spectacular things like posters, zines and flyers. Even online counter-info, including trolling on this site, is so detached from real-world relational dynamics. We need human contact, on both sides of the social fences. It’s getting very likely that I’ll never find a solution out of my mess... but I’m sure others can.

"The Socialist party coming to power hasn't changed anything." Yes it has - it's enabled the ruling class to get away with worse than under Sarkozy. A law is being put before parliament - and almost certainly bound to pass - that makes it an imprisonable offence for anyone expressing approval of terrorist acts, past or present, in private. Unliikely that this law will be applied to those approving of the arguably terrorist acts of the French resistance during WWll, and undoubtedly it's a law that will be difficult to apply anyway, but if Sarkozy had brought this in, the left wing of capital would have shouted it down. Also - and this they are applying - is that even those on social security (with some exceptions) will have to pay "taxe d'habitation", a tax on where you live. In some cases, this can mean as much as a 2 months' cut in benefits.

Also, I don't like the too easy way the word "fascist" is thrown around in this text (and generally): the totalitarianism spreading throughout the world is not the same as fascism, but far more insidious and subtle - a mixture of money terrorism and state repression but in a way that tends to dissipate communal resistance, individualising misery more and hiding at least some of the focus on the centralised state that made fascism a more obvious and cruder form of brutality and repression. It tends towards making people suicidal rather than explode outwards.

Equally, there's a rather liberal way of expressing things like "Even more worrisome than constantly increasing war budgets is the unwillingness of cops, gendarmes, soldiers and their politician bosses to take responsibility for their violence. The omnipresence and unrestrained usage of flashballs, defensive ball launchers, and explosive grenades are some concrete examples.". I suppose there has been a time where they backed off from mutilating or killing so obviously, but this was linked to a far greater degree of opposition in the streets and at workplaces than has been the case for at least 25 years. In the banlieux they have regularly killed kids by running into their stolen mopeds, tipping them up at the back to make it look like an accident. This discourse comes more from a political milieu than from those who experience state violence daily - for instance, in 2010, a 15 year old putting up a barricade at his high school in Montreuil (Paris) was shot with a flashball in the eye, and almost lost it. Last Friday (October 31st) in Blois near Paris, a 20 year old in fact lost his eye due to a flashball. In 2010, because of the pension movement, this became a major issue. But virtually no-one has mentioned the loss of this guy's eye on Halloween night in the "political" milieu, nor mentioned the 2 days of riots during which it happened.

"the totalitarianism spreading throughout the world is not the same as fascism, but far more insidious and subtle - a mixture of money terrorism and state repression but in a way that tends to dissipate communal resistance, individualising misery more and hiding at least some of the focus on the centralised state that made fascism a more obvious and cruder form of brutality and repression. It tends towards making people suicidal rather than explode outwards."

I agree with this but re-read on what fascism is about, and that's ALL in there. It's only more outwardly-centralized, in a way to make the centers of Power irrelevant. Centralization is replaced by normalization, standardization. The fascists today are all over the place and dress up all the same, yet their power center is hidden in plain view. They all wear a tie and their workers have black uniforms, from their waiter-ress to the cop.

they did mention the eye and a nose

this was written by comrades at the ZAD du Testet, which is a relatively new struggle compared to the anti-airport ZAD. when they started they were explicitly pacifist so this is a big, mature jump for them. it wasn't posted here to be picked apart -- comrades are asking to spread their rage. do it.

In an ugly way it's almost as if their struggle needed a martyr like Rémi... For knowing the pacifist gang who started the Testet, especially their old manarchist guru from the Pyr enees, I was, like several others, repelled against going to support them. But now there seems to be a vast surge and a shift of staff down the trench.

All thanks to... a police murder?

Plenty of precedent for kicking off revolts that way but it's pretty crass to thank them for lighting the match.

I wasn't. Just being puzzled by the way how many are always waiting for some horror being done by the State dogs so it gives leads us to a momentum to go on the offensive. This is aggressive-passive behavior that I don't really feel comfortable with.

It's crucial that actions like this have the expressed aim to take contested space from the police. To weaken their grip over specific neighborhoods and areas.

the second article, labeled "proposal" is a strategic proposal from an entirely different group of people than the ZAD du Testet.

Strange... I can't find any French version of the above text. jUSt hte original call, that is desperately liberal and boring like a parking lot. Is it only available in English?

A thing to note: yes, there are "liberal" calls, because there is a movement in course of building up. Last week twenty schools were blocked in Paris, mostly wild (and some legal) demos all over France, sabotage, postering - all this involves different people who may or may not be anarchists. ZAD is not an explicitly anarchist movement, they've also appealed for calm after Remi's death as far as I know, but this movement is not led by anyone, neither by ZAD nor by any of the legal organizations that take part in it. It is mostly about an increasingly mounting tension between the exploited and the police which can weird out even those who are familiar enough with the nature of French pigs. With a situation as tense as this, many people are going to be radicalized for sure.

Another thing to note: whether Remi was a pacifist or not (according to pigs' media it seems that he was not fighting the police when he was murdered) is of no importance whatsoever. Violent or not, each murder by pigs can not pass without explosive consequences.

everything old is new again in france. because antiglobe politics got us so far...

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
CAPTCHA
Human?
8
q
q
b
F
3
r
Enter the code without spaces.
Subscribe to Comments for "ZAD calls out for Intl day against police on November 22nd"
society