review

Of Indiscriminate Attacks & Wild Reactions

  • Posted on: 23 September 2017
  • By: thecollective

By Edelweiss Pirates
A handful of years ago, in the midst of fervent and continuing efforts on the part of many insurrectionary anarchists to generalize a critique of civilization itself and to push back against the lack of vision or initiative offered by left-anarchists, Individualists Tending toward the Wild (ITS) exploded onto the scene... literally. Bombs sent to nanotechnology scientists in the territory of Mexico were celebrated by many as impeccably targeted attacks against those functionaries most responsible for the increasingly nightmarish hellworld that would surely result from the innovations dreamt up and sought after by millionaires, military scientists, and statesmen. As always, discussions abounded about the method of attack and the logic within which it is deployed, about the ideas espoused by the group and the channels chosen for their dissemination. We stood then, as we stand now, against their world of colonization, slavery, and ecocide.

Anarchist Zines and Pamphlets Published in August 2017

  • Posted on: 2 September 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Sprout Distro

The following zines and pamphlets were released in the past month and are of interest to the broad anarchist space. We share these each month as a way of highlighting the variety of anarchist printed material and to encourage increased circulation and discussion. Please consider making copies of these and distributing them or hosting reading groups and discussion circles.

An Intimate History of Antifa

  • Posted on: 23 August 2017
  • By: thecollective

The New Yorker By Daniel Penny, August 22, 2017

On October 4, 1936, tens of thousands of Zionists, Socialists, Irish dockworkers, Communists, anarchists, and various outraged residents of London’s East End gathered to prevent Oswald Mosley and his British Union of Fascists from marching through their neighborhood. This clash would eventually be known as the Battle of Cable Street: protesters formed a blockade and beat back some three thousand Fascist Black Shirts and six thousand police officers. To stop the march, the protesters exploded homemade bombs, threw marbles at the feet of police horses, and turned over a burning lorry. They rained down a fusillade of projectiles on the marchers and the police attempting to protect them: rocks, brickbats, shaken-up lemonade bottles, and the contents of chamber pots. Mosley and his men were forced to retreat.

Book Review: The Day the Country Died — A History of Anarcho Punk 1980–1984

  • Posted on: 27 July 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Freedom UK

There are many great things about Ian Glasper’s The Day the Country Died: A History of Anarcho Punk 1980–1984. First, it’s convenient and persuasive to be able to read about a number of related bands in the same book. Don’t have to search here and there for information. Second, it’s solid seeing an emphasis just on anarcho punk. Just like nothing can replace holding hard copy of a zine in your hands, nothing can substitute for a substantive book. Third, back in the day, if you were on the fringes of multiple scenes or were really localised, then there was no way to know all these bands. Yeah, you nodded your head, but there’s a difference between knowing names and knowing the sound and history.

Review of Jonathan Matthew Smucker, Hegemony How-To: A Roadmap for Radicals

  • Posted on: 5 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Alpine Anarchist

Review of
Jonathan Matthew Smucker, Hegemony How-To: A Roadmap for Radicals (Chico et al.: AK Press, 2017)

There is much to admire in Jonathan Matthew Smucker’s Hegemony How-To: A Roadmap for Radicals. It adds another layer to the internal criticism of activist culture that we have seen in releases such as Matthew Wilson’s Rules Without Rulers: The Possibilities and Limits of Anarchism, J. Moufawad-Paul’s The Communist Necessity, and AAP’s Revolution Is More Than a Word: 23 Theses on Anarchism.

Anarchism Against Time

  • Posted on: 2 May 2017
  • By: rocinante

From stalking the earth via Reflexiones desde Anarres, a translation, May 2nd, 2k17

Anarchism Against Time[Anarquismos a contratiempo][1] is the new book by Tomás Ibáñez, recently edited by Virus in their Essay Collection, a work that invites us, from a libertarian and emancipatory spirit, radical and innovative, to reflect on the present, that is not to be confused with the march to despair.

Book Review: Bakunin. Selected Texts 1868-1875 (Edited and Translated by A.W. Zurbrugg)

  • Posted on: 11 April 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Anarkismo

Although the 20th century may have seemingly signalled the eclipse of libertarian forms of socialist thought under the bureaucratic weight of ‘real socialism’, Bakunin views are an urgent reminder of what socialism could be. His voice, in spite of some antiquated expressions, resonates a hundred and a half years later with the same vital energy.

Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist by Alexander Berkman, annotated and introduced by Jessica Moran and Barry Pateman

  • Posted on: 4 April 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From Kate Sharpley Library

Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist is a classic for good reason: the drama of the story drives it along. Berkman’s mission to assassinate Frick is interspersed with effective flashbacks showing his development to that point. In the prison there’s plenty of conflict which makes you wonder: how can he survive 22 years? Can the prisoners expose their mistreatment and the scams of the management? Will the escape plan work? I loved the cover: a piano with a pick and shovel leaning against it as a nod the outside comrades who dug a tunnel for him, covered by Vella Kinsella ‘tinkling the ivories’. There’s also the odd bit of unintentional comedy, like Berkman’s puzzlement when he first comes across prison slang: ‘I should “keep my lamps lit.” What lamps? There are none in the cell; where am I to get them? And what “screws” must I watch? And the “stools,”—I have only a chair here. Why should I watch it? Perhaps it’s to be used as a weapon.’ [p112]

Pages