France

Anarchists, Intersectionality, Races, Islamophobia, Etc.

  • Posted on: 12 July 2017
  • By: thecollective

A Dialogue on the French and Québecois Contexts

Since the publication of Houria Bouteldja’s book, Les Blancs, les Juifs et nous, in spring 2016 (Paris, La Fabrique [Whites, Jews, and Us, MIT Press/Semiotext(e), 2017]), a controversy surrounding the use of the term “race” has emerged in anarchist circles in France [1]. Those who use such a notion are called “racialist” and likened to racists. This particularly affects the concept of “intersectionality” that comes from the social sciences and has been taken up by activists in order to better articulate our thoughts about different forms of oppression, such as gender, race, and class [2]. Recently, the anarchist group Regard Noir [Black Gaze] (since voluntarily dissolved) published, with the Anarchist Federation, a pamphlet titled Classe, genre, race et anarchisme [Class, Gender, Race and Anarchism], featuring translations of short texts from the The Women’s Caucus of the British Anarchist Federation which help to reflect on the concept – and the phenomenon – of “privileges.” [3]

Two attacks, two perspectives: Enedis trucks and office torched in France

  • Posted on: 7 July 2017
  • By: thecollective

The attacks these reports are referring to both occurred last month in response to the call for a Dangerous June of rebellious acts in solidarity with anarchist prisoners in Italy. Both targeted the energy company Enedis, though for different reasons in addition to solidarity. The first attack, a torching of vans in Grenoble, takes a specific anti-technology stance; the latter offers a friendly critique of the focus on technology by expanding the fight to society and civilization itself.

Paris: A second trial of the struggle against the deportation machine

  • Posted on: 14 June 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

On May 30 2017, judge Gendre released a committal order of her own, sending seven additional companions and comrades to court in connection to the struggle against the deportation machine in Paris.

This second trial stems from a second preliminary inquiry that lead to five house searches in June 2010, then to the arrest of two additional people on October 28 and January 19 2011 (one of whom spent a week in pretrial prison). The charges ranged from “serious damage or destruction to property in a group” to refusing to give DNA and fingerprints [2], and also included “willfull group violence” relating to some unfriendly visits to the Air France office at Bastille square and to the SNCF (national train company) shop in Belleville, as well as to the redecoration of the poor windows of a Bouygues telecom store at the same time. These two actions took place on March 17 2010, a few hours after ten undocumented people were sentenced to years in prison for the fire that destroyed the Vincennes detention centre [3].

The Deportation Machine Case : Trial date set for four comrades on June 23 2017 in Paris

  • Posted on: 31 May 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

After seven and a half years of pre-trial hearings and thousands of pages of disclosure, after fifteen people had their homes searched, were arrested, followed, eavesdropped on, filmed, interrogated, incarcerated, placed on house arrest, and kept under various bail conditions for seven years, the state and the justice system will finally take only four people to trial on June 23 2017 in Paris.

Reading our times with Now: The invisible committee

  • Posted on: 29 May 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Autonomies

What follows is an exercise in the sharing of ideas, of visions. The most recent essay by the invisible committee, Now, continues a reflection-intervention that began with The Coming Insurrection and To Our Friends, and offers a powerful critique of contemporary politics, along with a defense of “autonomy”. What is proposed here then is a partial summary, and occasionally a commentary and exemplification, or simply a montage, of some of the ideas that animate their vision of our times.

Now: The Invisible Committee (1)

  • Posted on: 13 May 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Autonomies

With this post, we begin the translation into english of the Invisible Committee’s most recent essay, Maintenant/Now (following on The Coming Insurrection and To Our Friends) . And we do so because of the importance that we attribute, and have attributed, to their ongoing reflections on/interventions in our world.

May Day 2017 in Paris: A Report from the Streets

  • Posted on: 4 May 2017
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

On May Day 2017, massive demonstrations against capitalism and state violence took place in Paris, France. Afterwards, sensationalistic footage circulated around the world of police being attacked with Molotov cocktails. Yet these video clips do not show the larger context. They do not show the intensifying police repression of French society as a whole, nor the police attacks that provoked such desperate acts of self-defense. In this report from France, our Parisian correspondents describe the events of the day and offer more background on the clashes.

France: On Not Voting and Anti-Electoral Attack

  • Posted on: 4 May 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

I don't vote. Because I don't want to choose a master, to choose who will decide in my place what's right for me, who will force me to respect their choices, who will present those choices as my own. I don't want the majority to determine the conditions of my servitude, I don't want to the cattle to build the fences that enclose them and select those who will rule over me as well, regardless of what I think.

I don't vote because I don't want the world they force on us. I don't recognize the idea of the nation, of peoples, or of citizenship, because states always manage to construct identities that give the illusion of a unified population. My nationality, the language I speak, and the colour of my skin in no way determine who I am, and I don't recognize the borders of the state in which chance saw me born. In the same way, I don't want to hear about any “common good”, because I don't want to be part of any community – I don't want to be bound to anyone and I want to choose those with whom I build my life.

Pages