occupy

TOTW: Occupy 10 years later

Shock-u-py and Awe-cu-py

Around 10 years ago the first Occupy protest to grab large public attention began on September 17, 2011 in Zuccotti Park, New York City. By October, Occupy had setup camp in over 951 cities across 82 different countries, and over 600 spots in the USA. By the end of 2011 and not far into 2012 most of the Occupy spaces had been cleared by the authorities. This week, we’re taking a look back and into the future of Occupy ideas.

The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity

from the nation.com by David Graeber and David Wengrow, review by Daniel Immerwahr

Protest speaks a language of forceful insistence. “Defund the police,” “Build the wall”—the unyielding demands go back to Moses’ “Let my people go.” So it was curious when the July 2011 issue of the Vancouver-based magazine Adbusters ran a cryptic call to arms: a ballerina posing atop the famous Charging Bull statue on Wall Street, with the question “What is our one demand?” printed above her in red. The question wasn’t answered; readers were only told, “#OccupyWallStreet. September 17th. Bring tent.”

Occupy Wall Street/Occupy, ten years on

from Autonomies

The act of remembrance is not for us, as we so often repeat, one of simple commemoration, nor of retrospective evaluation: was an event, a movement, a revolt, a revolution, significant? The question begs criteria, criteria of what is politically and socially important, which is in turn judged according to “measurable” changes in what exists.

TOTW: Against the map makers

even anarchist map makers?

Topic of the week - Anarchist decolonization. Settler colonialism is ongoing and continues to play into the fabric of contemporary society, and what this means for resistance becomes a critical question for anarchists who seek radical liberatory visions of the future. Continuing the long tradition against colonialism, the state, and capitalism, this week we’re taking a look at anarchist decolonization.

Subscribe to RSS - occupy